Everybody remembers Mom's or Grandma's aprons. Some were utilitarian cotton half aprons or smocks in pretty colors or prints. Some were used only for special occasions in holiday motifs or fabics of organza or satin. Any vintage film of the 30-40-50's show any respectable woman wearing a dainty apron in the kitchen or as the hostess. We cannot forget June Cleaver with her fashionable kitchen ensemble. There was even one with matching oven mitt and dishtowel. With the advent of women's lib in the 70's the lowly apron represented women's servitude, those apron strings, those ties that bind, and they were cut. Fast forward 30 years, and many stained frocks later, the apron has found new popularity and uses. There is a new Apronation(C) on the horizon. Whether new or vintage the apron is not seen as being only utilitarian, but expresses our personality, our unique apronature(C). Apron's are not only worn in the kitchen, but in the garden and craft room, on the sales floor, and even as fashion accessories. Look below and choose your apron.

Join the Apronation(C) Today!

Google+ Followers

Friends in the Apronation

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Chicken Scratch

Okay, If you haven't noticed I have an obsession.......vintage aprons. My favorite material for an apron is gingham. The favorite embroidery technique to accent an apron is known as 'Chicken Scratch' 
A form of cross-stitch  also known as Snowflake Embroidery, Depression Lace. or Gingham Lace. 
These are examples of the embroidery

I repaired this vintage red gingham apron all the chicken scratch is along the bottom also incorporating rickrack with it. I added the hand-embroidered cherry appliques from a thread-bare vintage hankie.
It was created  for a giveaway a few years ago.



This brown gingham vintage apron is from my personal collection. I wear it during craft shows. This chicken scratch creates a floral pattern on both the hem and pocket.


This green gingham apron with chicken scratch was also repaired and restored
 The embroidery is located along the hem. I will make a wonderful Christmas apron when I'm finished.

Pink gingham with a different chicken scratch pattern. restored......this will make a perfect apron for a new MOM of a baby girl when ir's completed.



\This apron was a special order for a little girl who was learning to cook. I found this vintage gingham apron with other little girl keepsakes. It was plain chicken scratch  and embroidered flowers I restored then I added vintage glass flower buttons and spoon and fork charms.

I even found a vintage cookbook for the beginner to include with it from 1949

If you'd like to learn more about this versatile and very vintage stitch go HERE 

I'm on my way to visit the ColoradoLady for Vintage Thingy Thursdayhttp://coloradolady.blogspot.com/

7 comments:

  1. I also love vintage aprons. I think it's neat that your repair them. I normally pass them up at sales if they are in bad shape but it's nice to see you give them some some tlc.. Enjoy your weekend!

    ReplyDelete
  2. All my family were apron wearers. I still have some of them but I never wore them.

    ReplyDelete
  3. LOVE these aprons!! I love chicken scratch, and ric-rac, and gingham, too. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  4. I love aprons also! There is nothing like a vintage apron! I use mine...I'm a bad collector!

    ReplyDelete
  5. I love aprons and in real life I buy them all the time, but never use them...I even have some from Italy from our trip there, lol! My mother always used them! I think is forgetfulness, that's all, but I'm gonna use them when I cook from now on! I love ALL YOURS my friend, such adorable aprons. Thanks for visitng me sweetie. Hugs,
    FABBY

    ReplyDelete
  6. These are just the cutest aprons!! Thanks for sharing your collection at TTF!

    ReplyDelete
  7. I loved all the aprons, especially the first one. Love the little cherry appliqués.
    Thanks for visiting me today.
    I will soon be posting on my successful repair of my 27 year old Jenn Air cooktop.
    I am going to check out your other blog.
    Blessings, Gnger

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for stopping by the Apronation, where we're all tied
together by apron strings